About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CURRENT 19
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
it not change with things like civil rights things like gay rights. what is it about this issue? >> reporter: well, one of the hard things since it's legalized, most people especially younger women have come to expect this is their right, they have the right to this care. we're not out there demanding something new but we're encouraging to keep the right we already have. so it's not quite the same for a struggle in guy rights or something new. for this generation it's maintain what we already have so you're not going to see as much enthusiasm. now people are seeing what can happen if you take for grants the right to have access to an abortion care and people are starting to push back. i'm optimistic about how we feel about this going forward. >> michael: that's a great answer to the question. that's exactly right. it's keeping it right rather than trying to get a new right. that makes a difference. it's also a big difference to keep news coverage of this alive all the time. thank you kate sheppard from mother jones magazine for coming on "the war room"." we have a progressive from a red stat
martin luther king jr. stood for civil rights, non-violence organized labor social justice and ending war. today america usually remembers one out of five. i'll start with you tom why is that? >> we all take from dr. king and larger than life figures what we choose to, and sometimes there is an interest involved like avoiding his strong criticism of the vietnam war in 1967, which was very unpopular at the time with some of the black ministers, with the "new york times," with organized labor with much of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civi
freedom. >> cenk: he connected it to the civil rights and women's rights m. that was a moment today and one you should soak in. there were moments that i thought were--let's just put it this way ironic. >> obama: this generation of americans has been tested by crises that test our resolve and prove our resilience. the decade of war is just ending. >> cenk: only if it were so. there was recently a statement put out that basically the war on terror will continue indefinitely at least for another ten years but probably much longer than that, and by the way we had another drone strike in yemen today as president obama was saying that the war is coming to an end interesting. and then here is the issue of politics and the central theme of the campaign. remember how paul ryan and mitt romney talked about the takers? well the president addressed that. >> obama: we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medi
to the inauguration last week and the pet's ema bracing civil rights for gays and lesbians the boy scouts are far behind where america is today. >> jennifer: you raised this you never thought you would hear a president use the word "gay," and talking about stonewall and the president being in favor of gay marriage, and eliminating don't ask don't tell. how much do you think of a difference a president makes in a decision like this for the boy scouts? do you think he gave them coffer or maybe pushed them a little bit to be able to open up the boy scouts to gay leaders and scouts. >> i don't think that singular act was what tipped the scales. i think i has been a steady progress over the last 23 years, that americans are understanding you can't vilify and demonize their sisters and brothers and children anymore. and it isn't all that radical anymore. the majority of americans also agree with the president in marriage equality for people. the boy scouts were behind the times. it's wonderful to have a leader like president obama, but this really was a grass roots movement that
with civil rights just generally human rights and i think you see coalitions building that you didn't see in the past. people who didn't necessarily see lbgt rights as being on par with other rights. >> right. he has changed the conversation that fair is fair. >> fair is fair -- >> stephanie: no you wrote this. you had a great piece in the "the advocate" about this. the american people -- even if some people have a little -- i don't know if i really like gays, it's still fair is fair. and this is not fair and not equal. >> yeah, exactly. there's still a little squeakiness from some people but i still got a little bit of a you people vibe from some people yesterday, but you can tell that they are growing in their understanding of what is fair, what is equal. >> stephanie: right. >> and that notion of fairness is expanding to include factors that people hadn't considered in the past. gender identity is one of those things that we are going to have to tackle. >> i suspect scalia was instrumental in that. god, dad. i have no idea why she talks like a valley girl. oh, go
democratic state senator henry marsh a lifelong civil rights advocate left town to attend president obama's inauguration yesterday, the g.o.p. took advantage using their one-day majority of 20-19 to pass new redistricting lines that would create more republican-dominated districts. but in an apparent peace offering, virginia republicans did honor martin luther king as they adjourned. i'm kidding. they actually honored confederate general stonewall jackson on dr. king's holiday. tasteful. joining me now from d.c. is political reporter joe williams. and here with me in new york is the only and only sam seder host of the majority report. thank you for your time tonight to discuss all of this malfeasance. joe, let me start with you because my head hurts over this. help me out here. 41 votes to maintain a filibuster instead of 60 to break it. is that the kind of reform harry reid has been promising month after month? >> basically it is change we can believe in if you're a senator because what they want is a rule that can benefit them when they're in the minority. and that is kind of a half mea
was a veteran of the civil rights fight. double crassness to do it on the fact he's out of town attending the inraugation of the first black president. lee jackson king day, i was there. doesn't surprise me at all. what happens is you don't have a state where the consequences have to be paid for these kind of actions. you don't have a significant voting block. virginia has flipped from blue to red on the local level. not a whole lot of pushback from the democrats on the voter side until they get punished for these kind of actions it will continue. >> john: joe williams and host of ring of fire and the majority report sam seder. love talking to both of you. thank you forget for coming on. >> yet another mass shooting this time in the gun friendly state of texas. my congratulations to wayne lapierrre and the nra coming up. >> john: there was another shooting at another school today. this time in texas. at lone star college. the shooter wounded three people one critically, despite being surrounded by good guys with guns. thankfully, no one was killed. this shooting like all of the others tha
would all fly. it was so magnificent for him to take the spirit of dr. king the civil rights movement, take the american story and including everybody in it from our newest americans to our oldest citizens, and when he said our social safety net does not make us weak you could hear the oh throughout the whole crowd. >> jennifer: where were you christine? >> i was up to the president's right. we had a great view of the president and it was really really exciting. we were sitting right near artist john legend and cindy lopper both of who are very active in the community. we were all just cheering practically every line so we were a bit of a rowdy bunch but we were very very excited to be there, and looking out and seeing all of those people it was really really special and wonderful. >> jennifer: yeah, bill, i completely agree with everything, and the thing that struck me bill was that he really spoke clearly about income inequality you don't hear presidents often talking about poverty directly, and i was really encouraged by that. >> yeah what a contrast if m
's the critical part of it, right? when they dig in with their civil lawsuit they unearth more stuff as we found out today in the morgan stanley case. why didn't the government dig in? and let me pause at a theory for you and get your reaction to it. one, these guys give a tremendous amount of money to politicians. dick durban said frankly they own the place and he's the second more senior senator for the democrats in the senate. and they're all in the same circle. attorney general eric holder doesn't think waaaa i'm going to do deals that's my friend bob. i just represented him the other day. i'm not going to put bob in jail. >> there are a lot of political appointees. here eric holder and then lanny brewer chief of the criminal division of justice the man who sits at the crux of all this. there are a lot of justice attorneys who would love nothing more than to bring down a major banger, a major wall street player put a notch on their belt. that's a counter veiling to reality. you say without support from above it's hard for them to act and i think that's very likely true. on the other hand i t
thurman whom hated the civil rights bill so much, mr. dixiecrt that he stood tup on the floor of the senate for 24 hours and 18 minutes before he had to pee and filibuster ended and they voted. but that was the filibuster. now, it's come into something that happens all the time, that is routine that one senate can do to block a measure from coming up a vote. first, they have a vote of whether or not they are going to proceed to a vote. you can filibuster that. you can filibuster the main event, and you don't have to do a filibuster. all you have to say is: i am filibustering this and sit in your office and watch t.v. and nothing happens. it is outrageous. it is undemocratic. it's the tierney of the minority. we talked about this for so long with senators who were determined that not just this term, but last term term before, but this term for sure with democrats having 55 votes, there is no reason why they couldn't fix it. and if i canning it meant either getting rid of the filibuster or making people actually filibuster or roll in cots so the
groups and civil rights groups and some scholars is that we put together this omnibus road to electoral reform bill. it's 199 pages long. it has over 50 important changes, and you named some of them all right. and what we're doing is saying as far as we've come already voting still has a little bit more perfection. we can make it better, make it easier, make it friendly to the voters. that's what some people in politics don't want to do, but that's what those of us that are 160 in number, including senator kirsten gillibrand in new york just introduced, and we'll have our work cut out for us to make the election fair and easier for the american citizen. >> john: is this designed to help democratic voters or do both parties try to play dirty tricks with each other's voters? have democrats tried to suppress republican votes as well? >> we're not angels on the democratic side, but i cannot name you one instance to document that. i don't know about it. and look, all republicans are not all bad guys. a lot of these things are being done by their political organizations by a few elected offic
, they waited for their civil rights leader, senator henry marsh to leave town to vote on the gerrymander calling bill. getting comments on beyonce. bashrbara says she is gorgeous and talented. her voice inspires. leave her alone. >> bill: no. >> find us on twitter @bp show. >> i am disappointed. congressman, tuesday morning, yesterday morning, i was gushing all over what a phenomenal job beyonce did. >> don't tell me james taylor -- i thought he sounded awful good for his age. great voice. >> he did. >> he was live. >> right? >> thank god. >> did you recommends she was lip synching? i was looking at her. >> you saw the front. do you meet in a phone booth? >> the largest in congress bigger than the united states senate. >> no kidding. >> yeah. >> get everybody to go to meet in washed. >> they are being progressive >>>. >> like herding cats. you can't do it. >> so what impact do you feel you can have on this congress given john boehner and the tea party couldn't get anything done? >> politics in lining up votes and taking positions is all pressure. it'
and you have a candidate who said i would do this day vote against the civil rights act. >> john: that was rand paul. i think rand paul is like rick santorum in that he's not running for president but for higher public speaking fees for the rest of his life. it will be hillary against chris christie, a new york senator against a new jersey governor. his views are opposite of most of america. we know over 70% favor abortion rights. chris christie does not. do you think people would realize even a guy they like can have policies they don't like or is charisma more important than ideology? >> is that a trick question? >> john: no, it's a very real question. look at george w. bush. >> we love charisma and we love politicians with swagger. he has done good things with new jersey. you drive through and it even smells better. >> john: who doubt, and who cannot cheer what he has done for sandy victims. >> and the police forces, they love him too. >> john: and we could use that tunnel to manhattan as well. >> to predict anything about what chris christie's bigger play is on the national s
of the civil rights act and the voting changes that occurred then. but since then, we've heard no mention of the right to vote in this country being a protected right and the sanctity of that idea. i think the only thing -- first of all, we gotta remember, we vote every two years in this country. not every four. that needs to be the refrain from -- every time you talk about an election, anybody within the sound of my voice needs to -- when they talk about voting or any of those things or what's going to happen in the next election, you're not talking about 2016. you're talking about 2014. those often matter more so because that's when they sneak these folks through. that's when purple districts turn red because people are look the other way or are too busy. thanks for the call. appreciate it. we'll be back right after this. more of "the stephanie miller show". celebrating her mom's 90th birthday. >> she'll be back tomorrow though. >> she will. >> i'm sorry. that's inappropriate. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." desmond tutu said a quote that is one of my favorite quotes. "w
and poverty every much as civil rights. but in this speech this president addressed militarism, beautifully, and we believe in enduring security and peace does not mean perpetual war. he spoke about poverty beautifully without ever actually using the word, but talking about we are not a nation of takers, and the fact that he would use the word stone wall and he wasn't referring to a dead general, i was floored. i feel comfortable saying that i think dr. king would have been very proud and impressed with today's speech. >> jennifer: i'm glad to here that. totally agree. we're going to take a break and bring you more analysis of the krer moanny. [ rosa ] i'm rosa and i quit smoking with chantix. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or aft
. it was the only time that they could have a 20-19 vote. >> john: exactly. they did it because of a civil rights veteran in the virginia legislature who went to d.c. anyone in the media address this? even when the republican governor of the state said it was wrong, how were they able to do this on martin luther king day? itit was a holiday. weren't they closed? >> there hasn't been any conversation about how procedurally they were able to get that done. >> john: many think it wasn't legal. it will be challenged in the courts. it might be because virginia doesn't take dr. king's birthday holiday seriously. i don't know if you know this but i spent a lot of time there. my mom's from virginia. i have a lot of family there. >> i'm from virginia. >> you know it's not martin luther king. it is jackson -- they honor two confederate generals and this other fella. >> wow. cognitive dissidence. >> some republicans are backing away from it. >> and legislation hasn't passed on holidays before. there is no law saying you can't pass legislation on holidays. >> john: it is shady. to me, it seems like -- >> it
is the gay struggle, the lgbt struggle for equality is it the next civil rights movement. he linked those two together. then of course moving on and mentioning marriage equality for all americans. a position he came to just several months ago. really really powerful stuff. >> bill: huge reaction from the crowd. the president talked about climate change. didn't do much about it. talked about it when he was running in 2008. didn't do much about it in his first term. but he spent more time, more sentences talking about it. about climate change than any other single issue. do we have that? >> obama: we will respond to the threat of climate change. knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. [ cheers & applause ] >> bill: the president also in one of those sentences took it back to the bible and said we have a god-given mandate to -- which we do in genesis one and genesis 3 to preserve our planet and take care of our planet. >> it really sounded like he was trying to split off the republican coalition. get the practical republicans some of the evangelicals w
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)